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edward snowden, a spanish newspaper reported the nsa collected numbers and locations of the phone calls, but not actual content. this after learning that the nsa has also been tuning into the communications up dirty five world leaders. now the european union parliamentary delegation is preparing for a visit to the u.s. to express concerns over nsa surveillance tactics. political commentator sam sacks brings us more. >> german intelligence officials will come to washington dc to demand answers from the white house about surveillance on chancellor angela merkel. is a marked the partner from just a few months ago, when germany was defending its foes cooperation with the nsa. that was after edward snowden leak in june that the nsa was collecting a half ilya and telephone and internet telik communications every month. chancellor angela merkel was put to defend her government's cooperation with the nsa, saying it prevented terrorist attacks. we can only protect the population if we cooperate with others, her office said. edward snowden describe the cozy relationship between german spies and t
spied on by there were reports of him coming from edward snowden. and then a separate report in the el mound doe newspaper indicated that some 60 million people in spain, as well as 35 world leaders. their phones being tapped. giving some rather interesting numbers that have not been disclosed before. he said that their mission began on september 11th which is a reframe that has been heard time and time again, as this debate raged on, he said that on that day, 2,996 people were killed on september 11th, but here is the part that is that public has never heard before, he said that 20 beam from the nsa have been killed fighting what is called the war on terrorism, since then, and that 6,000 people from the nsa were deployed i guess to gather intelligence. he says there has not been a mass casualty in this country since 2001, he says that is not by luck, they have not stopped trying. he also points out that they have stopped 13 incidents in the united states, another 25 incidents across europe. anyclapper also saying he believes that we have been lawful, with regards to what has been taki
. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. national security director told the committee the content of phone calls remain secret, in a virtual lock box unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that he says is rare. >> they would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulatable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign or al-qaeda terrorists group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the hearing, there was relatively little discussion a
merkel's phone and allowed it to continue. it came out after edward snowden said the u.s. has spied on world leaders. what president obama spoke to chancellor merkel when the two spoke about the spying. >> the president said we're not going to do this going forward. >> but it may have been done in the past. >> we don't want to get into the business of inventorying everything we've done in the past but what we're looking at is how can we both make necessary reforms in how we gather intelligence and how can we be more transparent about what we're doing with our allies and the public. >> joining me now ambassador mark ginsburg. it's great to have you here. the white house finds itself caught between a rock and a hard place. now they have to come out and ask for forgiveness as opposed to permission, because they never would have gotten permission to do this. but this is not unheard of. this is what we do as a country. >> spies r us. >> we've been doing it for a long time. is it just the fact that we are surprised that it would get to this level and now expect to believe that the white h
resident, edward snowden. spain is the latest nation, demanding answers from the u.s. danielle nottingham reports from wjz -- for wjz, from washington, d.c. >> reporter: a del delegation of diplomats arrived. >> i think we have to make a clear distinction between fighting together terrorism, but not spying on friends. >> reporter: former national security agency contractor, edward snowden, leaked documents, revealing that the u.s. tapped german chancellor angla merkel's private cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying u.s. intelligence gathering is under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department analyst james louis said the u.s. won't stop the program because in a post-9/11 world, the info
is not letting up. all is coming from one-time resident edward snowden. spain is the latest nation, demanding answers from the u.s. danielle nottingham reports for wjz from washington. >> reporter: a delegation from european diplomats hope to limit u.s. spying on their leaders. >> i think i have to make a clear distinction between fighting together terrorism but not spying on friends. >> reporter: former national security agency contractor edward snowden released documents that revealed that the u.s. had tapped german canc lor angela merkel's cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying u.s. intelligence gathering is under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department analyst, james louis says the u.s
about the fallout from the edward snowden leaks. >> this is the most serious leak, most serious compromise in the u.s. intelligence committee. >> because of the amount of it and the type. >> the amount and the type. >> website reboot. secretary of hhs kathleen sebelius faces questions on capitol hill wednesday after healthcare.gov went down over the weekend adding fuel to the criticism and more fodder for snl. >> i have a number of friendly tips to help you deal with those problems. for example, have you tried restarting your computer. sometimes it helps to turn the computer off and turn it back on. we don't know why. it just does. >> poetic license, the literally legend maya angelou joins us this hour. children's love for books. >> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. edward snowden's leaks keep coming faster than the white house can even respond. over the weekend the nsa claimed president obama had no idea angela merkel's personal cell phone was tapped back since 2002. so how credible is that denial? joining me now is chuck todd nbc's white house correspondent, politic
edwards snowden and a lot has changed since then, especially for the people who helped leak the information. jonathan betz has a look at that story. >> it's a global story that began in the summer with edward snowden. he is now in asylum in russia but the scandal keeps unfolding because he reported handed over almost all of his secrets to two journalists, greenwald who is based in brazil. he keeps breaking stories printed in papers all over the world, usually until countries where they will make the biggest splash. greenwald works as a columnist for the guardian. on thursday, he is leaving that british paper to help start a new journalistic venture funded by the founder of ebay. that site will likely continue revealing nsa stories. his reporting partner will join him there. she was actually the first to connecticut with snowden but works mainly behind the scenes. she is a film maker putting together a documentary about all of this and then there is julian assange. he had a minor role. nudge went to wikileaks but he did help him avoid u.s. authorities. he remained holed up in
. >> a wall street journal finding president obama has reached his lowest approval. >> edward snowden has a new job, a lawyer for the n.s.a. leaker said his clients found a tech support job as a are you sure website. he has been living in the former soviet republic since granted asylum in august. those are your headlines. consider this is next. we have updates 24 hours a day on aljazeera.com. i'm dell walters in new york. we'll see you at the top of the hour. >> an al jazeera america exclusive. corruptions has reached is the higheshighest level of politics. how wide spread is this conduct? we'll run it down across america. an important follow up on a story we brought you recently. interpreters who risked their lives being kept in harm's way by political red tape. >> and the hemingway curse. one of america's moist america's families has been rocked by suicides. mariel hemingway will join us. >> we begin with corruption in california. >> in this report al jazeera investigative unit will look at a sting operation launched by the fbi. >> los angeles, a city where fame and infamego hand and ha
used by edward snowden shut down its operation in a bid to resist surveillance. silent circle then followed suit for fear that it would be require dod do the same. now mike jenky the c.e.o. of silent circle had this to say about the new joint venture. we believe e smail fundamentally broken in its current architecture. this is an opportunity to create a new ex-mail service where the keys are to create on the device and only the user can descript it. i'm joined by "rt" web producers andrew blake. tell me about this new venture, dark mail alliance. how is it going to work? >> you pretty much hit the nail on the head. it's going to be a few weeks before they release white paper. people are just finding out about it literally this week. what it would create a whole new protocol. e-mails we've been using it for decades. there have been minor changes. and it has been more secure as the technology has allowed that to happen. at the same time as you just heard from mr. jenky that a lot of people who are involved in this industry including representatives from lava bit and silent circl
closest allies. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. spain reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month. in germany, the newspaper records, president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn general sander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving murkle. the nsa says the willingness up to now to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president can assure the chancellor, the sungs not and will not 3407b tore the conversations of the chancellor. >> reporter: they are coming to the u.s. to challenge their american counterparts, after breaking quote german law on german soil. house chairman rodgers defended the nsa under surveillance on cnn sunday saying it was both well regulated and essential to keeping both americans and europeans safe from terrorism. >> i think the biggest
that several agency across asia were part of the spying. >> edward snowden wants to help germany figure out if the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone. he offered to help with the investigation and even offered to be a witness. the official says "he knows a lot." he is prepared to come to germ my and give testimony. the official says snowden insists that before coming to germany, "conditions must be discussed." he sent the a personal letter to merkel, which will be red publicly today. >> powerful storms pound the parts of ohio. >> the severe weather is expected to last through tonight, as well. ten people were injured. strong winds damages businesses and downed power lines. the storm caused flash floods on wednesday in sections of texas that left two dead. tornado warnings have been issued, high went gusts are also expected in new york and new england. >> let's bring in our meteorologist. >> very busy system here. what can we expect. >> very busy, we have close to 200 reports, five being tornadoes, close to 150 being wind reports, and also multiple reports of hail across much of the coun
. the leaks and outrage continued to spread. now in spain where documents leaked by edward snowden suggest the nsa man tored 60 million spanish phone calls in a single month. the outrage is palpable. in the press, on the streets. the people in this country feel the nsa has invaded their countries and their privacy. george? >> thanks, terry. let's get more on this from jon karl. they're saying the entire nsa program under review? >> reporter: that's right. they're saying nothing of substance about the reports yet but pointing to this review which they say will be done by december 15th. but, the nsa released a statement over the weekend saying that the nsa has never discussed with the president any program involving espionage on german chancellor, angela merkel. the president has to explain to our allies why we have been spying on them and explain why he, the president of the united states, didn't know anything about this for five years. >> hard to believe they wouldn't tell him. mean while, on the domestic front, healthcare.gov under continuous fire. kathleen sebelius will go to capitol hil
by contractor edward snowden. this comes amid the political fire storm over whether president obama was informed that the german prime minister's phone calls were wiretapped. >> giving any document at all about any world leader, the person briefing him or the briefing bookie would have to say where it came from, especially since it's so controversial, so sensitive, i should say. to no. i can't believe as commander in chief, as president of the united states that if this was being done that he didn't know about it. >> and others, democratic operatives, say there's every reason to believe the president did know that there was this danger and this is why he gave up his blackberry. >> when the private gave up his blackberry the day he became president and he was upset he had to give it up, why? because other countries would be listening in on it. the real miracle or stunning thing to me is that the british purchase thought she could talk to a cell phone and no one would be listening to her, allies or foes would be listening in on her conversations. of course we were. >> how does the n.s.a. respond t
for edward snowden says he now has a job in the country where he's seeking asylum. beginning tomorrow, snowden will work for a major russian website where he will be performing maintenance. for security reasons, his attorney isn't naming the employer. snowden is charged with espionage and theft of government property. >>> a secret service report detailing chris brown's alleged assault assault of a man here in washington, d.c. is shedding new light on the possibility defense strategy. the document obtained by cnn suggests that brown's bodyguard could take the rap for the broken nose, while lawyers could question the credibility of one of the police officers investigating the case. brown is currently serving felony probation for his 2009 domestic violence conviction involving the pop star rihanna. a big day here in washington for the new new jersey senator, the former mayor cory booker was sworn in by the vice president joe biden. later met privately with president obama over at the white house. there was a special election this month to serve out the term of the late democratic senator
to the nsa. we fired a lawsuit. lawsuit.a in 2008 we filed another. thanks to the leaks of edward snowden, this year we filed along with plaintiffs in the crowd a lawsuit stating that nsa surveillance violates the first amendment. we are a nonprofit civil liberties law and technology firm that got started way back in 1990, defending the rights of individuals to have constitutional rights when it comes to technology, but we can only do it because we have so many members supporting us, fighting with us, thank you for coming out here today. we could not do this without you. honestly, we could not do it without coalition members. a 100-plus organization to companies, folks who do amazing work all over the world, free press, who amazes me, you have no idea how many hours they put into putting this together. they have so much energy, you guys are the best. fight for the future, which makes me feel conservative by comparison. yesterday, friday, they put together 55 meetings in congress. citizens all over the country we came together and met in meetings for internet surveillance. we have demand p
million calls in spain in one month. documents provided by nsa leaker edward snowden. the spanish government summoned the american ambassador asking for an explanation. >>> this weekend, thousands of protesters marched on capitol hill demanding an end to the government surveillance program at home and abroad. many carried signs praising snowden and thanking him for blowing wistle on the nsa by leaking classified documents. this comes as international outrage builds over the broad scope of the nsa's data gathering over years. european leaders continue to put pressure on the country to for a new spying deal on allies. chefon, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> let's explain why it is some officials have explained perhaps why the president would not know about this for five years. >> as it was explained to us, this type of surveillance is the type of program or decision that would be executed at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a
in russia. former nsa contractor edward snowden is working in one of the largest companies. snowden will not release the name -- names this was customer the. he is still a fugitive from the u.s. >>> national security agency is answering requestiesies about reports is t is sty -- it is spying on everything from the united nations to google. >> reporter: when roman catholic cardinals were gathering to elect a new pope in march, a magazine says the u.s. had a pipeline into the vatican. they recorded vatican phone calls and could have eavesdropped on phone calls for those who elected pope francis. >>> also, wednesday, the united nation sis it received similar assure ans that its communication networks are not and will not be monitored by intelligence. but it was not clear whether they were monitored in the past. but it's not just international bodies and city states that are alleged targets. the washington post said they connected google and ya hoo office -- ya hoo offices worldwide. the nsa denied the tactic, saying it gets data from such companies only through court orders. of course,
on and on and on. one assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and support the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and be
, but not spying on friends. >> reporter: former national security agency contractor edward snowden leaked documents revealing the u.s. tapped german chancellor awningle -- angella merkel's cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying, u.s. intelligence gather suggest under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can, but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department james lewis says the u.s. won't stop the program because in a post-9/11 world, the information is too valuable. >> this makes us safer. less surveillance means less successful successful -- more successful attacks. >> reporter: danielle nottingham, wjz eyewitness news. >> some u.s. lawmakers are defending the spying practices. they argue places like france are safer because of the n
, but cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto has more. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. in spain, reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month and in germany the "sontag" newspaper reports president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls back in 2010, contradicting white house assurances the president was not aware of the extent of the surveillance. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn "general alexander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel." the nsa's denial a clear step beyond the white house's willingness up to now only to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> reporter: german intelligence officials are expected to come to the u.s.
by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. host: kevin on twitter asks -- guest: you're caller earlier talked about the boston bo
edward snowden. host: if you want to read more on that story, that is the front page of the "washington post." the front page of today's "usa just a little bit from that piece. host: that story in today's "usa today." on this subject of the hearings yesterday, play more calls and comments, some e-mails coming in. if you watched the hearing, you know a lot more about how wonderful it is that millions more will be covered. ,ecretary sebelius was direct and the congress representatives showed their hate and anger and. mona this morning -- hate and ignorance. mona this morning e-mailing entered we go to stanley on our line for democrats. good morning. caller: happy thursday. enemy and it is us. it is amazing be caller's and a lack of knowledge. i mean, they are basically regurgitating partyline talking points. we need to do a lot more research and a lot more looking into the real facts. i think sebelius did an excellent job of answering the questions. by the way, i think history will rate obama in the top 10 presidents. we just need to do more research. ok, we go to raymond from george on o
discovered. we'll tell you where. >>> more apparent leaks from edward snowden. how the nsa hacked google and yahoo! jon: right now we're learn about a new sophisticated border tunnel that may have been used to smuggle drugs between the u.s. and mexico. investigators in recent years have found a whole slew of such passageways of the you will probably remember this one uncovered back in 2012. roughly 240 yards long running bee heneath the boredder in arizona. we're told the new discovery runs from san diego to tijuana. the feds have not confirmed what it was used for, when it was built or exactly how well-engineered it is. some tunnels are quite advanced. this one in 2012 as well was 600 yards long equipped with electric railcars, lights and even ventilation. jenna: well another story in the nsa spying saga. new reports that the feds secretly hacked google and yahoo! breaking into their highly secure data centers and stealing essentially, confidential information from hundred of millions of user accounts. this according to new documents from leaker edward snowden and they have been reporte
. with wicki leaks and edward snowden spilling our beans every day what's happening on the exchanges is the best-kept secret in washington, d.c. the national security agency could learn something from secretary sebelius. today i will ask consent to approve a six-page bill i introduced yesterday to require the the administration to answer these questions every week. secretary sebelius is not responsible for enacting obamacare, but she has been responsible for three and a half years for implementing it. now many americans have only a few weeks to purchase new insurance or be without health insurance. to expect the secretary to correct in a few weeks what she's not been able to do in three and a half years is unrealistic. mr. president, it's time for the president to ask the secretary of health and human services to resign. i thank the president and i yield the floor. mr. hatch: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from utah. mr. hatch: during debate over debt limit increase in 2009 -- 2006, then-senator obama stated that -- quote -- "the fact that we are here today to deba
very soon. >> thank you, connell. dagen: from janet yellen's new job to edward snowden. a lawyer for the nsa whistleblower says his client will be joining one of russia's largest websites as a technical support role. the lawyer did not say what website snowden will be working for but he did say he starts tomorrow. he has been in russia since given asylum. the irony is the russian government is spying. so enjoy living in russia where they spy on everything you do. connell: google glass, which we have talked about on this show come all the rage. driving while wearing these glasseclasses will cost you a py penny. one woman just found out about that. we will tell you about it. dagen: and making history. $1000 plus wager seats definitely worth it for game six last night. connell: congratulations. the city of boston. speaking of sports, not changing the redskins name becoming a big controversy but we will talk about why money was a big issue for him and how the team should move forward coming up. state and for all that on "markets now." a look at oil now, and then we will come back and
weapons. >>> after getting his new job in russia, the nsa secrets spiller edward snowden is plotting his next move. while meeting with a german lawmaker in moscow, snowden reportedly offered to testify in germany, if he is offered asylum there. the germans want to know more of america's wiretapping of their chancellor, angela merkel's cell phone. >>> the secretary of state john kerry, admitting that some of our surveillance, quote, has gone too far. >>> this morning, shocking new numbers about the obama care rollout. take a look at this. documents released by house republicans show only six people, six, were able to enroll on health plans the day that healthcare.gov was launched. by the end of the second day, 248 people had enrolled. the white house is pushing back saying glitches on the site make early data unreliable. >>> a halloween surprise for airport security agents across the border. they stopped a woman with pumpkins in her luggage. look closely at the x-ray. they say the bags in the pumpkins, filled with cocaine. $120,000 worth. >>> caught on tape, a disaster for an auto mechani
the roots of some navy shoots. francis is accused of charging the navy fuel. >>> edward snowden wants the united states to drop charges against him. snowden has been charged with federal crimes for leaking classified documents. he releesed a -- released a letter asking for international help to persuade the u.s. authorities to let him off the hook. snowden says he would testify before congress about the nsa surveillance programs. dianne feinstein says he already had that chance. >> he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle- blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee, and say, look, i have some information you ought to see. that didn't happen. >> now, the documents snowden released about the nsa's surveillance programs around the world, they've angered many u.s. allies. >>> a high-testify research company -- a high-tech research says documents released by snowden says the nsa had customer information from google, facebook, apple. reportedly this has made companies around the world wary about doing business with amer
. edward snowden wrote an open letter published in a german magazine. he calls it manifesto for truth. jim scuitto, what does he include? >> he tries to make the case that he's not a spy, but a whistle-blower on what he calls the global problem of mass surveillance. in this her he calls the u.s. and britain the worst offenders, and condemns them. the debate he says, quote, they wanted to avoid is now taking place in countries around the world, he wrote, instead of causes damage, the use is causing society to push for political reforms, oversight and new laws. >> i spoke to a senior state department official about this, is snowden had a legal means. he could have pursued it in the nsa, taken it up to the inspector general. if that wasn't good enough, he could have gone to court. in fact he's saying he could come back and face the charge in course. that's the legal way to pursue his case. his position, of course, is he won't get a fair trial here. >> the whole issue of u.s./iranian relations. today we saw a huge demonstration marking the 23rd anniversary of the takeover of the -- what does t
and help him. back to you, kate. >> thank you so much. >>> in russia, nsa leaker edward snowden is starting a new job. diana magnay has details from moscow. >> edward snowden starts a new job, tech support his lawyer says for a major russian website. we don't know which one but there's one that seems most likely, the russian version of facebook. it made snowden a very public job offer a few weeks back. it's the only major site who hasn't denied hiring him and it's recently launched a highly encrypted messaging system to protect user privacy. it sounds like a good fit but this is still guesswork. kate. >> thank you. in china, if you've ever had trouble opening a got of beer, you'll feel for these guys, trying to do it with a helicopter. monita rajpal explains. >> the best helicopter pilots have been showing off amazing skills in the skies. you might think it would be easier to open this beer bottle by hands but these teams at the tournament clearly relevant itch a challenge. pilots had eight minutes to open five beer bottles perched on poles above the ground without breaking them, the idea b
of europe's scorn. the white house can thank nsa leaker, edward snowden. president obama has had to apologize to hollande, merkel, and current and former leaders in mexico and president ruseff who even canceled a state visit to washington she was so angry. while the nsa scandal is also causing protests at home, with european allies, it could cost serious money. the european union, america's largest trading partner, is threatening to cancel pending trade talks in the u.s. >> when we're doing this in germany, france, great britain, other nations we've been allied with in fighting al qaeda, invading libya, these kinds of things just trample trust. >> the administration and its defenders say most of the spying is legitimate for the protection of the u.s. and its allies. >> so a bad guy in afghanistan can use networks in france or germany or great britain or the united states and plan operations with somebody else who may be in afghanistan, but you could still use all of those networks. >> the nsa has issued an unusual denial of one british report that said president obama had been to
as a victory by people like edward snowden and gl glenn greenwald. >> did you talk to glenn at all? it seems a narrow view when he says is angela merkel a terrorist. you hear from the obama administration side that these intelligence services do a lot more than just only try to intercept communications amongst terrorists. there's a lot more to it. >> right. exactly. a lot of it is about the economic side. a lot of it is, you know, just trying to figure out who's meeting who and what's going on. clearly since 9/11 you and i both know that the emphasis has been on trying to disrupt any kind of plots or plans or conspiracies to commit harm against the united states, either in the u.s. or around the world. and against u.s. allies. so that is why prime minister cameron and other strong u.s. allies have been very robust in their defense of this kind of data collection. we also know that, yes, angela merkel is a strong u.s. ally, but in the past, germany has had, obviously with east germany, it was a communist country, so a lot of spying was done in relation to that. its relations and its trade and
is for david ignatius for sure. new reporting confirms what edward snowden leaked last week that the scope extends to some of america's closest allies abroad. the "wall street journal" reports that the national security agency ended a program that spied on as many as 35 world leaders after the white house ordered a review over the summer. officials say several programs have been shut down and others are expected to be close to the later date. the report states president obama spent nearly five years in office in the dark. unaware of the nsa's practices overseas. the targets of the programs are not decided by the president, but by the agency. yesterday congressman peter king defended the program saying they should be viewed as a positive thing for everyone involved. >> i think the president should stop apologizing and being defensive. the nsa saved thousands of lives not just in the united states, but in france and germany and throughout europe. we are not doing this for the fun of it, but to gather intelligence that helps not just us. >> there reports out of germany that the president did
this out, maintaining relevance in the arena, it should have been better by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. ho
operating. and the leaks which stemmed from information from former nsa contractor edward snowden just keep coming. two spanish newspapers say the nsa secretly monitored 60 million phone calls in spain just in one month. here in washington, mixed reaction from lawmakers. >> this whole notion that we're going to go after each other on what is really legitimate protection of nation/state interests, i think is disingenuous. >> we have repair work to do. >> reporter: abc news, washington. >>> congress now looking into the case against amanda knocks. two lawmakers from her state of washington holding a panel discussion on capitol hill as the retrial of knox is underway in italy without her. knox was convicted of killing her british roommate in 2009. her sentence was overturned after she served of course years. an italian court ordered a new trial. >>> a federal judge in texas has struck down a major part of the state's restrictive new abortion law. advocates say a provision requiring doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital less than 30 miles away would have shuttered about 1/3 of the
you had the wiki leaks, private manning, and now you have edward snowden who has ansed and international -- international uproar. there are young people who have other ideas and they are willing to take the risk of putting them out. it is an interesting and relatively new development that makes it hard. some secrets should be kept, but it is a question of degree. it looks as though the nsa was doing too much. they have to do some things, obviously. there has to be a balance between security and freedom. could live in a police state where the government knew everything. there has to be a balance between what the government freedom do and our own and civil liberties and rights. they happen to be guerin teed in a thing called the constitution of the united states. host: is glenn greenwald a journalist or an activist? erie: you have to ask him it i think he is a little bit of both. host: why do you say that? guest: he made no secret that he has a point of view. that means he is an activist. he was also writing for "the guardian." papers a liberal, leftish which has done som
and what edward snowden has done? >> guest: um, i believe in whistleblowers. i mean, i do think that whistleblowers perform a public service, especially when there's corruption in government or pharmaceuticals or harming people and they step forward. i'm mixed on snowden. i am mixed. i do believe that there's certain secrets that you have to keep for the security of our country, and perhaps i've changed a little bit on that since 9/11. but i don't know quite what to make on the snowden thing. parts of it, parts of his disclosures i think have gotten us into a national debate and conversation that's constructive and good. and i don't know about the rest. i'm sorry to -- i'm not copping out, i just simply haven't come down hard on one side or the other. >> host: about 30 minutes left in our interview with kitty kelley, this month's "in depth" guest on booktv. phil in north hollywood, california, good afternoon. >> caller: hi there, peter. really love your show. i always get some new insight from writers that i've known or just discovered. ms. kelley, just curious to know with all
assessment that edward snowden have access to raw material in the business record database. why is that the case? i think i would make the case that the current program is one of the most highly read debated programs in the federal government today, and i think that goes to the benefit of folks have privacy concerns or interest in the protection of such data. so what do i mean with its highly rated program? for one, pursuant to the order, but it has to be kept segregated from all other types of raw intelligence your number two, the purpose of the program is purely for characters and purposes the data can't be used for other, for other purposes as we have just been discussing might be the case, in other circumstances. three, the program is reauthorized every 90 days by the foreign intelligence surveillance court. we at nsa together with justice report to fisk every 30 days on use of the data. the program is audited every 90 days by the department of justice. pursuant to the court order, only 22 senior officials may approve wary into the data and those queries have to be based on
stems from edward snowden and all of these documents. there is another one out this morning that suggests that the u.s. was listening into some 60 million calls in spain over a year. so you have real problems diplomatically from this. >> it's unbelievable, too. like the peter king method of embracing it. it's called a hamburg cell, we need to embrace it and listening in. >> listen to them, don't listen to us. >> he said stop apologizing for this. >> have a great program, bret baier's program runs at 6:00 o'clock eastern time right here on the fox news channel. we're all big fans of that. >> have a good day. >> now for the rest of headline, we'll go to heather nauert. >> good morning to you. it looks like such a beautiful day in washington, d.c michael jackson's former doctor walking free. conrad murray was released from an l.a. county jail at midnight. this video shows him driving away inside of a cop car. murray served just two years of his four-year prison sentence for giving jackson a deadly dose of propothol. what's raising eyebrows, murray says he's planning to try to g
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